Amnesty International

Philippines: Supreme Court ruling bolsters landmark law on reproductive rights

Tue, 04/08/2014 - 11:29am
Headline Title:  Philippines: Supreme Court ruling bolsters landmark law on reproductive rights 08 April 2014

 

The Philippine Supreme Court’s decision on Tuesday to uphold a landmark reproductive health law as constitutional is an important victory for millions of Filipino women and girls, Amnesty International said. 

 

The court’s decision, which will require the government to provide free contraception to millions of the nation’s poorest women, is being welcomed by activists across the country. 

 

“Today’s Supreme Court ruling is a victory for the independence of the judiciary and means that millions of women and girls have a right to access medical services and information they need,” said Hazel Galang-Folli, Amnesty International’s Researcher on the Philippines. 

 

“The Philippine authorities must resist all ongoing efforts to roll back the country’s landmark law on sexual and reproductive rights. Caving in to pressure would mean denying women and girls their human rights.” 

 

There were, however, some disappointing concessions, some of which are inconsistent with the state’s international human rights obligations. A total of eight provisions were deemed to be unconstitutional by the court – these included key provisions that would have prohibited health practitioners from refusing to provide reproductive health services and required all private health facilities to provide family planning methods. 

 

In a country where 80 percent of the population is Roman Catholic, surveys have shown that 72 percent of Filipinos support the law. 

 

“While the law is not perfect, it paves the way to removing some of the existing barriers in protecting women and girl’s human right to sexual, reproductive and maternal healthcare.  The challenge now will be ensuring that the law is properly implemented and that sufficient resources are dedicated to making it effective,” said Hazel Galang-Folli. 

 

Background 

 

Notable changes in the law include the rejection of Section 23 which would have prohibited health care practitioners from refusing to provide –or refusing to refer to others who would provide—reproductive health services. Section 23 would have also allowed married individuals to undergo reproductive health procedures without the consent of their spouse. 

 

The ruling also declared unconstitutional section 7, which would have required private health facilities, including those owned by religious groups, to provide family planning methods, including medical consultations, supplies and procedures. This provision would have also allowed girls under 18 who already have children or who have suffered a miscarriage to access modern family planning methods, including contraception, without the need for a written consent from their parents. 

 

 Striking down these provisions of the law mean that some women and adolescents will be at risk of not accessing services they need and are lawfully entitled to receive.  The state should, at a minimum fulfil its international human rights obligations and ensure that there are providers willing and able to provide services and that spousal and parental  consent requirements do not hinder women’s and adolescents’ access to sexual and reproductive health care services. 

 

As well as enabling public health centres to distribute contraceptives, the law will also introduce reproductive health education into the nation’s schools at a time when the birth-rate in the Philippines stands at around 25 per 1,000 people, one of the highest in Asia.  The Philippines should ensure that reproductive health education is in line with their international human rights obligations, which includes ensuring that reproductive health education is accurate and comprehensive and that it promotes gender equality. 

The Philippine Supreme Court’s decision on Tuesday to uphold a landmark reproductive health law as constitutional is an important victory for millions of Filipino women and girls, Amnesty International said. 

Media Node:  Philippines SRR law Story Location:  Philippines 15° 30' 40.9788" N, 121° 0' 12.3048" E “Today’s Supreme Court ruling is a victory for the independence of the judiciary and means that millions of women and girls have a right to access medical services and information they need ” Source:  Hazel Galang-Folli, Amnesty International’s Researcher on the Philippines Date:  Tue, 08/04/2014 URL:  Reproductive rights gains for women in the Philippines Description:  News story, 17 December 2012 URL:  My Body, My Rights Description:  Global campaign

Philippines: Supreme Court ruling bolsters landmark law on reproductive rights

Tue, 04/08/2014 - 11:29am
Headline Title:  Philippines: Supreme Court ruling bolsters landmark law on reproductive rights 08 April 2014

 

The Philippine Supreme Court’s decision on Tuesday to uphold a landmark reproductive health law as constitutional is an important victory for millions of Filipino women and girls, Amnesty International said. 

 

The court’s decision, which will require the government to provide free contraception to millions of the nation’s poorest women, is being welcomed by activists across the country. 

 

“Today’s Supreme Court ruling is a victory for the independence of the judiciary and means that millions of women and girls have a right to access medical services and information they need,” said Hazel Galang-Folli, Amnesty International’s Researcher on the Philippines. 

 

“The Philippine authorities must resist all ongoing efforts to roll back the country’s landmark law on sexual and reproductive rights. Caving in to pressure would mean denying women and girls their human rights.” 

 

There were, however, some disappointing concessions, some of which are inconsistent with the state’s international human rights obligations. A total of eight provisions were deemed to be unconstitutional by the court – these included key provisions that would have prohibited health practitioners from refusing to provide reproductive health services and required all private health facilities to provide family planning methods. 

 

In a country where 80 percent of the population is Roman Catholic, surveys have shown that 72 percent of Filipinos support the law. 

 

“While the law is not perfect, it paves the way to removing some of the existing barriers in protecting women and girl’s human right to sexual, reproductive and maternal healthcare.  The challenge now will be ensuring that the law is properly implemented and that sufficient resources are dedicated to making it effective,” said Hazel Galang-Folli. 

 

Background 

 

Notable changes in the law include the rejection of Section 23 which would have prohibited health care practitioners from refusing to provide –or refusing to refer to others who would provide—reproductive health services. Section 23 would have also allowed married individuals to undergo reproductive health procedures without the consent of their spouse. 

 

The ruling also declared unconstitutional section 7, which would have required private health facilities, including those owned by religious groups, to provide family planning methods, including medical consultations, supplies and procedures. This provision would have also allowed girls under 18 who already have children or who have suffered a miscarriage to access modern family planning methods, including contraception, without the need for a written consent from their parents. 

 

 Striking down these provisions of the law mean that some women and adolescents will be at risk of not accessing services they need and are lawfully entitled to receive.  The state should, at a minimum fulfil its international human rights obligations and ensure that there are providers willing and able to provide services and that spousal and parental  consent requirements do not hinder women’s and adolescents’ access to sexual and reproductive health care services. 

 

As well as enabling public health centres to distribute contraceptives, the law will also introduce reproductive health education into the nation’s schools at a time when the birth-rate in the Philippines stands at around 25 per 1,000 people, one of the highest in Asia.  The Philippines should ensure that reproductive health education is in line with their international human rights obligations, which includes ensuring that reproductive health education is accurate and comprehensive and that it promotes gender equality. 

The Philippine Supreme Court’s decision on Tuesday to uphold a landmark reproductive health law as constitutional is an important victory for millions of Filipino women and girls, Amnesty International said. 

Media Node:  Philippines SRR law Story Location:  Philippines 15° 30' 40.9788" N, 121° 0' 12.3048" E “Today’s Supreme Court ruling is a victory for the independence of the judiciary and means that millions of women and girls have a right to access medical services and information they need ” Source:  Hazel Galang-Folli, Amnesty International’s Researcher on the Philippines Date:  Tue, 08/04/2014 URL:  Reproductive rights gains for women in the Philippines Description:  News story, 17 December 2012 URL:  My Body, My Rights Description:  Global campaign

Philippines: Supreme Court ruling bolsters landmark law on reproductive rights

Tue, 04/08/2014 - 11:29am
Headline Title:  Philippines: Supreme Court ruling bolsters landmark law on reproductive rights 08 April 2014

 

The Philippine Supreme Court’s decision on Tuesday to uphold a landmark reproductive health law as constitutional is an important victory for millions of Filipino women and girls, Amnesty International said. 

 

The court’s decision, which will require the government to provide free contraception to millions of the nation’s poorest women, is being welcomed by activists across the country. 

 

“Today’s Supreme Court ruling is a victory for the independence of the judiciary and means that millions of women and girls have a right to access medical services and information they need,” said Hazel Galang-Folli, Amnesty International’s Researcher on the Philippines. 

 

“The Philippine authorities must resist all ongoing efforts to roll back the country’s landmark law on sexual and reproductive rights. Caving in to pressure would mean denying women and girls their human rights.” 

 

There were, however, some disappointing concessions, some of which are inconsistent with the state’s international human rights obligations. A total of eight provisions were deemed to be unconstitutional by the court – these included key provisions that would have prohibited health practitioners from refusing to provide reproductive health services and required all private health facilities to provide family planning methods. 

 

In a country where 80 percent of the population is Roman Catholic, surveys have shown that 72 percent of Filipinos support the law. 

 

“While the law is not perfect, it paves the way to removing some of the existing barriers in protecting women and girl’s human right to sexual, reproductive and maternal healthcare.  The challenge now will be ensuring that the law is properly implemented and that sufficient resources are dedicated to making it effective,” said Hazel Galang-Folli. 

 

Background 

 

Notable changes in the law include the rejection of Section 23 which would have prohibited health care practitioners from refusing to provide –or refusing to refer to others who would provide—reproductive health services. Section 23 would have also allowed married individuals to undergo reproductive health procedures without the consent of their spouse. 

 

The ruling also declared unconstitutional section 7, which would have required private health facilities, including those owned by religious groups, to provide family planning methods, including medical consultations, supplies and procedures. This provision would have also allowed girls under 18 who already have children or who have suffered a miscarriage to access modern family planning methods, including contraception, without the need for a written consent from their parents. 

 

 Striking down these provisions of the law mean that some women and adolescents will be at risk of not accessing services they need and are lawfully entitled to receive.  The state should, at a minimum fulfil its international human rights obligations and ensure that there are providers willing and able to provide services and that spousal and parental  consent requirements do not hinder women’s and adolescents’ access to sexual and reproductive health care services. 

 

As well as enabling public health centres to distribute contraceptives, the law will also introduce reproductive health education into the nation’s schools at a time when the birth-rate in the Philippines stands at around 25 per 1,000 people, one of the highest in Asia.  The Philippines should ensure that reproductive health education is in line with their international human rights obligations, which includes ensuring that reproductive health education is accurate and comprehensive and that it promotes gender equality. 

The Philippine Supreme Court’s decision on Tuesday to uphold a landmark reproductive health law as constitutional is an important victory for millions of Filipino women and girls, Amnesty International said. 

Media Node:  Philippines SRR law Story Location:  الفلبين 15° 30' 40.9788" N, 121° 0' 12.3048" E “Today’s Supreme Court ruling is a victory for the independence of the judiciary and means that millions of women and girls have a right to access medical services and information they need ” Source:  Hazel Galang-Folli, Amnesty International’s Researcher on the Philippines Date:  Tue, 08/04/2014 URL:  Reproductive rights gains for women in the Philippines Description:  News story, 17 December 2012 URL:  My Body, My Rights Description:  Global campaign

Philippines: Supreme Court ruling bolsters landmark law on reproductive rights

Tue, 04/08/2014 - 11:29am
Headline Title:  Philippines: Supreme Court ruling bolsters landmark law on reproductive rights 08 April 2014

 

The Philippine Supreme Court’s decision on Tuesday to uphold a landmark reproductive health law as constitutional is an important victory for millions of Filipino women and girls, Amnesty International said. 

 

The court’s decision, which will require the government to provide free contraception to millions of the nation’s poorest women, is being welcomed by activists across the country. 

 

“Today’s Supreme Court ruling is a victory for the independence of the judiciary and means that millions of women and girls have a right to access medical services and information they need,” said Hazel Galang-Folli, Amnesty International’s Researcher on the Philippines. 

 

“The Philippine authorities must resist all ongoing efforts to roll back the country’s landmark law on sexual and reproductive rights. Caving in to pressure would mean denying women and girls their human rights.” 

 

There were, however, some disappointing concessions, some of which are inconsistent with the state’s international human rights obligations. A total of eight provisions were deemed to be unconstitutional by the court – these included key provisions that would have prohibited health practitioners from refusing to provide reproductive health services and required all private health facilities to provide family planning methods. 

 

In a country where 80 percent of the population is Roman Catholic, surveys have shown that 72 percent of Filipinos support the law. 

 

“While the law is not perfect, it paves the way to removing some of the existing barriers in protecting women and girl’s human right to sexual, reproductive and maternal healthcare.  The challenge now will be ensuring that the law is properly implemented and that sufficient resources are dedicated to making it effective,” said Hazel Galang-Folli. 

 

Background 

 

Notable changes in the law include the rejection of Section 23 which would have prohibited health care practitioners from refusing to provide –or refusing to refer to others who would provide—reproductive health services. Section 23 would have also allowed married individuals to undergo reproductive health procedures without the consent of their spouse. 

 

The ruling also declared unconstitutional section 7, which would have required private health facilities, including those owned by religious groups, to provide family planning methods, including medical consultations, supplies and procedures. This provision would have also allowed girls under 18 who already have children or who have suffered a miscarriage to access modern family planning methods, including contraception, without the need for a written consent from their parents. 

 

 Striking down these provisions of the law mean that some women and adolescents will be at risk of not accessing services they need and are lawfully entitled to receive.  The state should, at a minimum fulfil its international human rights obligations and ensure that there are providers willing and able to provide services and that spousal and parental  consent requirements do not hinder women’s and adolescents’ access to sexual and reproductive health care services. 

 

As well as enabling public health centres to distribute contraceptives, the law will also introduce reproductive health education into the nation’s schools at a time when the birth-rate in the Philippines stands at around 25 per 1,000 people, one of the highest in Asia.  The Philippines should ensure that reproductive health education is in line with their international human rights obligations, which includes ensuring that reproductive health education is accurate and comprehensive and that it promotes gender equality. 

The Philippine Supreme Court’s decision on Tuesday to uphold a landmark reproductive health law as constitutional is an important victory for millions of Filipino women and girls, Amnesty International said. 

Media Node:  Philippines SRR law Story Location:  Philippines 15° 30' 40.9788" N, 121° 0' 12.3048" E “Today’s Supreme Court ruling is a victory for the independence of the judiciary and means that millions of women and girls have a right to access medical services and information they need ” Source:  Hazel Galang-Folli, Amnesty International’s Researcher on the Philippines Date:  Tue, 08/04/2014 URL:  Reproductive rights gains for women in the Philippines Description:  News story, 17 December 2012 URL:  My Body, My Rights Description:  Global campaign

USA/UK: Snowden alleges spy agencies have targeted human rights defenders

Tue, 04/08/2014 - 10:48am
Headline Title:  USA/UK: Snowden alleges spy agencies have targeted human rights defenders 08 April 2014

Former US intelligence contractor and whistleblower Edward Snowden’s latest allegations point to a very real risk that human rights defenders, including Amnesty International staff, have been the targets of mass surveillance by the US and British spy agencies. 

Snowden, who is living in exile in Moscow, made the remarks this afternoon via videoconference to the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe (PACE) in Strasbourg, France. 

When asked if the US National Security Agency (NSA) or its British counterpart Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) were actively spying on human rights organizations such as Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch and others, he said: “Without question, yes, absolutely …The NSA has in fact specifically targeted the communications of either leaders or staff members in a number of purely civil or human rights organizations of the kind described”.

“These allegations, if substantiated, would confirm our long-held fears that state intelligence agencies like the NSA and GCHQ have been subjecting human rights organizations to mass surveillance all along,” said Michael Bochenek, Senior Director of International Law and Policy at Amnesty International. 

“This raises the very real possibility that our communications with confidential sources have been intercepted. Sharing this information with other governments could put human rights defenders the world over in imminent danger. When these concerns were raised before the US Supreme Court, they were dismissed as being ‘speculative’. Snowden’s latest revelation shows that these concerns are far from theoretical – they are a very real possibility. 

“We now need a full and frank disclosure of the extent of these surveillance programmes as well as water-tight legal guarantees against such indiscriminate surveillance in the future.” 

Former US intelligence contractor and whistleblower Edward Snowden’s latest allegations point to a very real risk that human rights defenders, including Amnesty International staff, have been the targets of mass surveillance by US and British spy agencies. 

 

Media Node:  Snowden PACE remarks Twitter Tag:  Surveillance Story Location:  United States 34° 46' 4.0404" N, 85° 38' 57.8904" W See map: Google Maps “The NSA has in fact specifically targeted the communications of either leaders or staff members in a number of purely civil or human rights organizations...” Source:  Edward Snowden, former US intelligence contractor and whistleblower Date:  Tue, 08/04/2014 “These allegations, if substantiated, would confirm our long-held fears that state intelligence agencies have been subjecting human rights organizations to mass surveillance all along” Source:  Michael Bochenek, Senior Director of International Law and Policy at Amnesty International Date:  Tue, 08/04/2014 URL:  New global coalition urges governments to keep surveillance technologies in check Description:  News story, 4 April 2014 URL:  Solving the ‘Big Brother Problem’ That Affects Every One of Us Description:  Blog, 22 January 2014 URL:  Surveillance without oversight a danger to society Description:  Blog, 20 June 2013 URL:  The lives of others – the USA must do more than ‘tighten the bolts’ on surveillance Description:  Blog, 15 August 2013 URL:  USA: Revelations about government surveillance ‘raise red flags’ Description:  News story, 7 June 2013

USA/UK: Snowden alleges spy agencies have targeted human rights defenders

Tue, 04/08/2014 - 10:48am
Headline Title:  USA/UK: Snowden alleges spy agencies have targeted human rights defenders 08 April 2014

Former US intelligence contractor and whistleblower Edward Snowden’s latest allegations point to a very real risk that human rights defenders, including Amnesty International staff, have been the targets of mass surveillance by the US and British spy agencies. 

Snowden, who is living in exile in Moscow, made the remarks this afternoon via videoconference to the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe (PACE) in Strasbourg, France. 

When asked if the US National Security Agency (NSA) or its British counterpart Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) were actively spying on human rights organizations such as Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch and others, he said: “Without question, yes, absolutely …The NSA has in fact specifically targeted the communications of either leaders or staff members in a number of purely civil or human rights organizations of the kind described”.

“These allegations, if substantiated, would confirm our long-held fears that state intelligence agencies like the NSA and GCHQ have been subjecting human rights organizations to mass surveillance all along,” said Michael Bochenek, Senior Director of International Law and Policy at Amnesty International. 

“This raises the very real possibility that our communications with confidential sources have been intercepted. Sharing this information with other governments could put human rights defenders the world over in imminent danger. When these concerns were raised before the US Supreme Court, they were dismissed as being ‘speculative’. Snowden’s latest revelation shows that these concerns are far from theoretical – they are a very real possibility. 

“We now need a full and frank disclosure of the extent of these surveillance programmes as well as water-tight legal guarantees against such indiscriminate surveillance in the future.” 

Former US intelligence contractor and whistleblower Edward Snowden’s latest allegations point to a very real risk that human rights defenders, including Amnesty International staff, have been the targets of mass surveillance by US and British spy agencies. 

 

Media Node:  Snowden PACE remarks Twitter Tag:  Surveillance Story Location:  United States 34° 46' 4.0404" N, 85° 38' 57.8904" W See map: Google Maps “The NSA has in fact specifically targeted the communications of either leaders or staff members in a number of purely civil or human rights organizations...” Source:  Edward Snowden, former US intelligence contractor and whistleblower Date:  Tue, 08/04/2014 “These allegations, if substantiated, would confirm our long-held fears that state intelligence agencies have been subjecting human rights organizations to mass surveillance all along” Source:  Michael Bochenek, Senior Director of International Law and Policy at Amnesty International Date:  Tue, 08/04/2014 URL:  New global coalition urges governments to keep surveillance technologies in check Description:  News story, 4 April 2014 URL:  Solving the ‘Big Brother Problem’ That Affects Every One of Us Description:  Blog, 22 January 2014 URL:  Surveillance without oversight a danger to society Description:  Blog, 20 June 2013 URL:  The lives of others – the USA must do more than ‘tighten the bolts’ on surveillance Description:  Blog, 15 August 2013 URL:  USA: Revelations about government surveillance ‘raise red flags’ Description:  News story, 7 June 2013

USA/UK: Snowden alleges spy agencies have targeted human rights defenders

Tue, 04/08/2014 - 10:48am
Headline Title:  USA/UK: Snowden alleges spy agencies have targeted human rights defenders 08 April 2014

Former US intelligence contractor and whistleblower Edward Snowden’s latest allegations point to a very real risk that human rights defenders, including Amnesty International staff, have been the targets of mass surveillance by the US and British spy agencies. 

Snowden, who is living in exile in Moscow, made the remarks this afternoon via videoconference to the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe (PACE) in Strasbourg, France. 

When asked if the US National Security Agency (NSA) or its British counterpart Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) were actively spying on human rights organizations such as Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch and others, he said: “Without question, yes, absolutely …The NSA has in fact specifically targeted the communications of either leaders or staff members in a number of purely civil or human rights organizations of the kind described”.

“These allegations, if substantiated, would confirm our long-held fears that state intelligence agencies like the NSA and GCHQ have been subjecting human rights organizations to mass surveillance all along,” said Michael Bochenek, Senior Director of International Law and Policy at Amnesty International. 

“This raises the very real possibility that our communications with confidential sources have been intercepted. Sharing this information with other governments could put human rights defenders the world over in imminent danger. When these concerns were raised before the US Supreme Court, they were dismissed as being ‘speculative’. Snowden’s latest revelation shows that these concerns are far from theoretical – they are a very real possibility. 

“We now need a full and frank disclosure of the extent of these surveillance programmes as well as water-tight legal guarantees against such indiscriminate surveillance in the future.” 

Former US intelligence contractor and whistleblower Edward Snowden’s latest allegations point to a very real risk that human rights defenders, including Amnesty International staff, have been the targets of mass surveillance by US and British spy agencies. 

 

Media Node:  Snowden PACE remarks Twitter Tag:  Surveillance Story Location:  United States 34° 46' 4.0404" N, 85° 38' 57.8904" W See map: Google Maps “The NSA has in fact specifically targeted the communications of either leaders or staff members in a number of purely civil or human rights organizations...” Source:  Edward Snowden, former US intelligence contractor and whistleblower Date:  Tue, 08/04/2014 “These allegations, if substantiated, would confirm our long-held fears that state intelligence agencies have been subjecting human rights organizations to mass surveillance all along” Source:  Michael Bochenek, Senior Director of International Law and Policy at Amnesty International Date:  Tue, 08/04/2014 URL:  New global coalition urges governments to keep surveillance technologies in check Description:  News story, 4 April 2014 URL:  Solving the ‘Big Brother Problem’ That Affects Every One of Us Description:  Blog, 22 January 2014 URL:  Surveillance without oversight a danger to society Description:  Blog, 20 June 2013 URL:  The lives of others – the USA must do more than ‘tighten the bolts’ on surveillance Description:  Blog, 15 August 2013 URL:  USA: Revelations about government surveillance ‘raise red flags’ Description:  News story, 7 June 2013

USA/UK: Snowden alleges spy agencies have targeted human rights defenders

Tue, 04/08/2014 - 10:48am
Headline Title:  USA/UK: Snowden alleges spy agencies have targeted human rights defenders 08 April 2014

Former US intelligence contractor and whistleblower Edward Snowden’s latest allegations point to a very real risk that human rights defenders, including Amnesty International staff, have been the targets of mass surveillance by the US and British spy agencies. 

Snowden, who is living in exile in Moscow, made the remarks this afternoon via videoconference to the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe (PACE) in Strasbourg, France. 

When asked if the US National Security Agency (NSA) or its British counterpart Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) were actively spying on human rights organizations such as Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch and others, he said: “Without question, yes, absolutely …The NSA has in fact specifically targeted the communications of either leaders or staff members in a number of purely civil or human rights organizations of the kind described”.

“These allegations, if substantiated, would confirm our long-held fears that state intelligence agencies like the NSA and GCHQ have been subjecting human rights organizations to mass surveillance all along,” said Michael Bochenek, Senior Director of International Law and Policy at Amnesty International. 

“This raises the very real possibility that our communications with confidential sources have been intercepted. Sharing this information with other governments could put human rights defenders the world over in imminent danger. When these concerns were raised before the US Supreme Court, they were dismissed as being ‘speculative’. Snowden’s latest revelation shows that these concerns are far from theoretical – they are a very real possibility. 

“We now need a full and frank disclosure of the extent of these surveillance programmes as well as water-tight legal guarantees against such indiscriminate surveillance in the future.” 

Former US intelligence contractor and whistleblower Edward Snowden’s latest allegations point to a very real risk that human rights defenders, including Amnesty International staff, have been the targets of mass surveillance by US and British spy agencies. 

 

Media Node:  Snowden PACE remarks Twitter Tag:  Surveillance Story Location:  United States 34° 46' 4.0404" N, 85° 38' 57.8904" W See map: Google Maps “The NSA has in fact specifically targeted the communications of either leaders or staff members in a number of purely civil or human rights organizations...” Source:  Edward Snowden, former US intelligence contractor and whistleblower Date:  Tue, 08/04/2014 “These allegations, if substantiated, would confirm our long-held fears that state intelligence agencies have been subjecting human rights organizations to mass surveillance all along” Source:  Michael Bochenek, Senior Director of International Law and Policy at Amnesty International Date:  Tue, 08/04/2014 URL:  New global coalition urges governments to keep surveillance technologies in check Description:  News story, 4 April 2014 URL:  Solving the ‘Big Brother Problem’ That Affects Every One of Us Description:  Blog, 22 January 2014 URL:  Surveillance without oversight a danger to society Description:  Blog, 20 June 2013 URL:  The lives of others – the USA must do more than ‘tighten the bolts’ on surveillance Description:  Blog, 15 August 2013 URL:  USA: Revelations about government surveillance ‘raise red flags’ Description:  News story, 7 June 2013

Russian court forces closure of prominent human rights NGO

Tue, 04/08/2014 - 10:26am
Headline Title:  Russian court forces closure of prominent human rights NGO 08 April 2014

Today’s decision by the St Petersburg City Court to deny the appeal of a prominent Russian non-governmental organization (NGO) against a previous court order to register as a “foreign agent” is a legal assault on the whole of civil society in Russia, Amnesty International said.

Anti-Discrimination Centre Memorial, an important human rights NGO working on behalf of victims of racism and xenophobia in Russia, decided to close down its activities in Russia rather than wear the label of a “foreign agent” or risk the criminal prosecution of its leader for failing to register.  

“The court had two options, and its choice was not in favour of justice and human rights. Its disheartening decision is in line with the prevailing tendency promoted by the Russian government to stamp its authority on any civil society activity. It sets a dangerous precedent which could be used against other NGOs,” said Sergei Nikitin, Director of Amnesty International’s Moscow office.

“The Russian authorities are deliberately depriving Russian society of an alternative voice, of checks and balances to the government’s actions. They attack anybody who dares to criticize them.”

The persecution of ADC Memorial started more than a year ago when the Prosecutor’s Office referred to its report, Roma, migrants and activists: the victims of police abuse, submitted to the UN Committee Against Torture (CAT) in November 2012, as evidence of ADC Memorial being involved in “political activity” and hence, violating Russia’s newly adopted law by failing to register as a “foreign agent”.

The NGO successfully resisted two court cases brought against it by the Prosecutor’s Office, in May and July 2013. However, on 12 December 2013 a court in St Petersburg found in favour of the Prosecutor’s Office’s new request to recognize all of ADC Memorial’s activities as “political” and compel it to register as a “foreign agent”.

After today’s ruling, ADC Memorial’s head, Stefania Kulaeva, voiced her disappointment to Amnesty International:

“The court proceedings were not objective. Our arguments were not considered. Our lawyers were interrupted time and again while the prosecution was given a free rein.”

The “foreign agents” law, introduced more than a year ago, gives the Russian authorities the power to impose hefty fines and severe administrative penalties on organizations which receive foreign funding and engage in loosely defined “political activities” but fail to register as “an organization performing the functions of a foreign agent”.

The court decision against ADC Memorial comes the same day as Russia’s Constitutional Court ruled that the “foreign agents law” is in line with the country’s Constitution. A number of NGOs and the Human Rights Ombudsman Vladimir Lukin had challenged the law on the grounds that it violates the rights to freedom of expression and association, both of which are purportedly protected under Russia’s Constitution.

“It has become increasingly clear that the Russian authorities are hell-bent on crushing civil society at all costs,” said Sergei Nikitin. 

St Petersburg City Court denies the appeal of prominent Russian non-governmental organization, Memorial, against a previous court order to register as a “foreign agent”.

Media Node:  putin Twitter Tag:  russia Story Location:  United Kingdom 56° 16' 14.9196" N, 54° 18' 59.0616" E See map: Google Maps “The Russian authorities are deliberately depriving Russian society of an alternative voice, of checks and balances to the government’s actions.” Source:  Amnesty International’s Sergei Nikitin

Russian court forces closure of prominent human rights NGO

Tue, 04/08/2014 - 10:26am
Headline Title:  Russian court forces closure of prominent human rights NGO 08 April 2014

Today’s decision by the St Petersburg City Court to deny the appeal of a prominent Russian non-governmental organization (NGO) against a previous court order to register as a “foreign agent” is a legal assault on the whole of civil society in Russia, Amnesty International said.

Anti-Discrimination Centre Memorial, an important human rights NGO working on behalf of victims of racism and xenophobia in Russia, decided to close down its activities in Russia rather than wear the label of a “foreign agent” or risk the criminal prosecution of its leader for failing to register.  

“The court had two options, and its choice was not in favour of justice and human rights. Its disheartening decision is in line with the prevailing tendency promoted by the Russian government to stamp its authority on any civil society activity. It sets a dangerous precedent which could be used against other NGOs,” said Sergei Nikitin, Director of Amnesty International’s Moscow office.

“The Russian authorities are deliberately depriving Russian society of an alternative voice, of checks and balances to the government’s actions. They attack anybody who dares to criticize them.”

The persecution of ADC Memorial started more than a year ago when the Prosecutor’s Office referred to its report, Roma, migrants and activists: the victims of police abuse, submitted to the UN Committee Against Torture (CAT) in November 2012, as evidence of ADC Memorial being involved in “political activity” and hence, violating Russia’s newly adopted law by failing to register as a “foreign agent”.

The NGO successfully resisted two court cases brought against it by the Prosecutor’s Office, in May and July 2013. However, on 12 December 2013 a court in St Petersburg found in favour of the Prosecutor’s Office’s new request to recognize all of ADC Memorial’s activities as “political” and compel it to register as a “foreign agent”.

After today’s ruling, ADC Memorial’s head, Stefania Kulaeva, voiced her disappointment to Amnesty International:

“The court proceedings were not objective. Our arguments were not considered. Our lawyers were interrupted time and again while the prosecution was given a free rein.”

The “foreign agents” law, introduced more than a year ago, gives the Russian authorities the power to impose hefty fines and severe administrative penalties on organizations which receive foreign funding and engage in loosely defined “political activities” but fail to register as “an organization performing the functions of a foreign agent”.

The court decision against ADC Memorial comes the same day as Russia’s Constitutional Court ruled that the “foreign agents law” is in line with the country’s Constitution. A number of NGOs and the Human Rights Ombudsman Vladimir Lukin had challenged the law on the grounds that it violates the rights to freedom of expression and association, both of which are purportedly protected under Russia’s Constitution.

“It has become increasingly clear that the Russian authorities are hell-bent on crushing civil society at all costs,” said Sergei Nikitin. 

St Petersburg City Court denies the appeal of prominent Russian non-governmental organization, Memorial, against a previous court order to register as a “foreign agent”.

Media Node:  putin Twitter Tag:  russia Story Location:  United Kingdom 56° 16' 14.9196" N, 54° 18' 59.0616" E See map: Google Maps “The Russian authorities are deliberately depriving Russian society of an alternative voice, of checks and balances to the government’s actions.” Source:  Amnesty International’s Sergei Nikitin

Russian court forces closure of prominent human rights NGO

Tue, 04/08/2014 - 10:26am
Headline Title:  Russian court forces closure of prominent human rights NGO 08 April 2014

Today’s decision by the St Petersburg City Court to deny the appeal of a prominent Russian non-governmental organization (NGO) against a previous court order to register as a “foreign agent” is a legal assault on the whole of civil society in Russia, Amnesty International said.

Anti-Discrimination Centre Memorial, an important human rights NGO working on behalf of victims of racism and xenophobia in Russia, decided to close down its activities in Russia rather than wear the label of a “foreign agent” or risk the criminal prosecution of its leader for failing to register.  

“The court had two options, and its choice was not in favour of justice and human rights. Its disheartening decision is in line with the prevailing tendency promoted by the Russian government to stamp its authority on any civil society activity. It sets a dangerous precedent which could be used against other NGOs,” said Sergei Nikitin, Director of Amnesty International’s Moscow office.

“The Russian authorities are deliberately depriving Russian society of an alternative voice, of checks and balances to the government’s actions. They attack anybody who dares to criticize them.”

The persecution of ADC Memorial started more than a year ago when the Prosecutor’s Office referred to its report, Roma, migrants and activists: the victims of police abuse, submitted to the UN Committee Against Torture (CAT) in November 2012, as evidence of ADC Memorial being involved in “political activity” and hence, violating Russia’s newly adopted law by failing to register as a “foreign agent”.

The NGO successfully resisted two court cases brought against it by the Prosecutor’s Office, in May and July 2013. However, on 12 December 2013 a court in St Petersburg found in favour of the Prosecutor’s Office’s new request to recognize all of ADC Memorial’s activities as “political” and compel it to register as a “foreign agent”.

After today’s ruling, ADC Memorial’s head, Stefania Kulaeva, voiced her disappointment to Amnesty International:

“The court proceedings were not objective. Our arguments were not considered. Our lawyers were interrupted time and again while the prosecution was given a free rein.”

The “foreign agents” law, introduced more than a year ago, gives the Russian authorities the power to impose hefty fines and severe administrative penalties on organizations which receive foreign funding and engage in loosely defined “political activities” but fail to register as “an organization performing the functions of a foreign agent”.

The court decision against ADC Memorial comes the same day as Russia’s Constitutional Court ruled that the “foreign agents law” is in line with the country’s Constitution. A number of NGOs and the Human Rights Ombudsman Vladimir Lukin had challenged the law on the grounds that it violates the rights to freedom of expression and association, both of which are purportedly protected under Russia’s Constitution.

“It has become increasingly clear that the Russian authorities are hell-bent on crushing civil society at all costs,” said Sergei Nikitin. 

St Petersburg City Court denies the appeal of prominent Russian non-governmental organization, Memorial, against a previous court order to register as a “foreign agent”.

Media Node:  putin Twitter Tag:  russia Story Location:  United Kingdom 56° 16' 14.9196" N, 54° 18' 59.0616" E See map: Google Maps “The Russian authorities are deliberately depriving Russian society of an alternative voice, of checks and balances to the government’s actions.” Source:  Amnesty International’s Sergei Nikitin

Russian court forces closure of prominent human rights NGO

Tue, 04/08/2014 - 10:26am
Headline Title:  Russian court forces closure of prominent human rights NGO 08 April 2014

Today’s decision by the St Petersburg City Court to deny the appeal of a prominent Russian non-governmental organization (NGO) against a previous court order to register as a “foreign agent” is a legal assault on the whole of civil society in Russia, Amnesty International said.

Anti-Discrimination Centre Memorial, an important human rights NGO working on behalf of victims of racism and xenophobia in Russia, decided to close down its activities in Russia rather than wear the label of a “foreign agent” or risk the criminal prosecution of its leader for failing to register.  

“The court had two options, and its choice was not in favour of justice and human rights. Its disheartening decision is in line with the prevailing tendency promoted by the Russian government to stamp its authority on any civil society activity. It sets a dangerous precedent which could be used against other NGOs,” said Sergei Nikitin, Director of Amnesty International’s Moscow office.

“The Russian authorities are deliberately depriving Russian society of an alternative voice, of checks and balances to the government’s actions. They attack anybody who dares to criticize them.”

The persecution of ADC Memorial started more than a year ago when the Prosecutor’s Office referred to its report, Roma, migrants and activists: the victims of police abuse, submitted to the UN Committee Against Torture (CAT) in November 2012, as evidence of ADC Memorial being involved in “political activity” and hence, violating Russia’s newly adopted law by failing to register as a “foreign agent”.

The NGO successfully resisted two court cases brought against it by the Prosecutor’s Office, in May and July 2013. However, on 12 December 2013 a court in St Petersburg found in favour of the Prosecutor’s Office’s new request to recognize all of ADC Memorial’s activities as “political” and compel it to register as a “foreign agent”.

After today’s ruling, ADC Memorial’s head, Stefania Kulaeva, voiced her disappointment to Amnesty International:

“The court proceedings were not objective. Our arguments were not considered. Our lawyers were interrupted time and again while the prosecution was given a free rein.”

The “foreign agents” law, introduced more than a year ago, gives the Russian authorities the power to impose hefty fines and severe administrative penalties on organizations which receive foreign funding and engage in loosely defined “political activities” but fail to register as “an organization performing the functions of a foreign agent”.

The court decision against ADC Memorial comes the same day as Russia’s Constitutional Court ruled that the “foreign agents law” is in line with the country’s Constitution. A number of NGOs and the Human Rights Ombudsman Vladimir Lukin had challenged the law on the grounds that it violates the rights to freedom of expression and association, both of which are purportedly protected under Russia’s Constitution.

“It has become increasingly clear that the Russian authorities are hell-bent on crushing civil society at all costs,” said Sergei Nikitin. 

St Petersburg City Court denies the appeal of prominent Russian non-governmental organization, Memorial, against a previous court order to register as a “foreign agent”.

Media Node:  putin Twitter Tag:  russia Story Location:  United Kingdom 56° 16' 14.9196" N, 54° 18' 59.0616" E See map: Google Maps “The Russian authorities are deliberately depriving Russian society of an alternative voice, of checks and balances to the government’s actions.” Source:  Amnesty International’s Sergei Nikitin

USA: Texas Governor must stop execution of Mexican man with mental disability

Tue, 04/08/2014 - 10:03am
Headline Title:  USA: Texas Governor must stop execution of Mexican man with mental disability 08 April 2014

Texas Governor Rick Perry must stop Wednesday’s execution of Ramiro Hernández Llanas, a Mexican national with a mental disability, Amnesty International said today. 

The state has relied upon racial stereotyping and the views of discredited “expertise” to secure this death sentence – now due to be carried out shortly after 6pm, local time, on 9 April. 

After the Texas Board of Pardons and Paroles denied clemency for Ramiro Hernández Llanas on Monday, his final hope for mercy is a reprieve from the state governor. 

“This case cries out for Governor Perry to use his power of reprieve. He must recognise that the state has relied upon shoddy ‘expert’ testimony to get Ramiro Hernández Llanas to the death chamber,” said Rob Freer, Amnesty International’s researcher on the USA. 

At the 2000 trial, the prosecution turned to the testimony of a discredited psychiatrist, Dr James Grigson, to rebut the opinions of mental health experts retained by the defence. Grigson, who had never examined the defendant, declared that Ramiro Hernández Llanas would likely commit future acts of criminal violence because he was a sociopath who lacked a conscience. Persuading the jury that the defendant will be a “future danger” to society, even in prison, is a prerequisite for a death sentence in Texas. 

“Testimony like Dr Grigson’s has been discredited over the years as ‘junk science’, and he himself was reprimanded and then expelled from the American Psychiatric Association because of his resort to such unscientific testimony in capital trials,” said Rob Freer. 

“Given what came next – psychiatric testimony tainted by racial stereotyping – this case stands out starkly as another Texas injustice about to be turned into permanence in the lethal injection chamber.” 

Another psychiatrist, Dr Richard Coons, was presented by the state at a 2008 hearing to rebut a defence expert’s finding that Ramiro Hernández Llanas has ‘mental retardation’ – which would render his execution illegal under a 2002 US Supreme Court ruling. 

Dr Coons never met the prisoner or anyone who knew him, does not speak Spanish, and claimed that the prisoner’s criminal conduct was appropriate for his “cultural group”. 

“It is a fundamental principle of international law that everyone is equal before the law and has the right to criminal proceedings free from racial or other discrimination,” said Rob Freer. 

“While we believe that the death penalty never equates with justice, surely even proponents of judicial killing should see the injustice of a death sentence secured after the presentation of such tainted testimony.” 

The Mexican government filed a brief in the US Supreme Court in January condemning the “defamatory stereotyping of the functional abilities of persons raised in Mr Hernandez’s low socio-economic, Mexican culture”. 

The American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, founded in 1876, together with The Arc of the United States, the USA’s largest community-based organization working with people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, also urged the Court to intervene. It refused to do so. 

Last week the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights issued “precautionary measures”, calling on the USA not to go ahead with the execution so that the Commission could have time to consider a petition before it. Today, the Commission stressed that for the USA to allow the execution to go ahead in these circumstances would “seriously contravenes its international legal obligations”. 

“Texas is no stranger to injustice when it comes to the death penalty,” said Rob Freer. 

“Here it is again, about to carry out a death sentence secured with highly questionable testimony against someone whose mental disability calls the constitutionality of his execution into serious question. Governor Perry must act as a matter of urgency.” 

Background information 

Ramiro Hernández Llanas was sentenced to death in February 2000 for the murder of his employer, Glen Lich, who was bludgeoned to death at his ranch in Kerr County on 14 October 1997. 

Ramiro Hernández Llanas was born into a childhood of abuse and severe poverty in Mexico, with his family living in a cardboard shack next to a rubbish dump on which they would scavenge. In tests conducted over the past decade, Ramiro Hernández Llanas has been assessed as having an IQ in the 50s or 60s. He suffers from severe adaptive functioning deficits across a range of skill areas including linguistic, academic, conceptual, social, work and domestic. 

There have been 15 executions in the USA this year, five of them in Texas. Since judicial killing resumed in the USA in 1977 under revised capital statutes, there have been 1,374 executions nationwide. Texas accounts for 513 of these executions; 274 of them have occurred during Governor Perry’s time in office. 

Rick Perry must stop Wednesday’s execution of Ramiro Hernández Llanas, a Mexican national with a mental disability.

Media Node:  texas Twitter Tag:  deathpenalty Story Location:  United Kingdom 37° 18' 16.722" N, 102° 18' 16.8768" W See map: Google Maps “Governor Perry must recognise that the state has relied upon shoddy ‘expert’ testimony to get Ramiro Hernández Llanas to the death chamber.” Source:  Amnesty International’s Rob Freer

USA: Texas Governor must stop execution of Mexican man with mental disability

Tue, 04/08/2014 - 10:03am
Headline Title:  USA: Texas Governor must stop execution of Mexican man with mental disability 08 April 2014

Texas Governor Rick Perry must stop Wednesday’s execution of Ramiro Hernández Llanas, a Mexican national with a mental disability, Amnesty International said today. 

The state has relied upon racial stereotyping and the views of discredited “expertise” to secure this death sentence – now due to be carried out shortly after 6pm, local time, on 9 April. 

After the Texas Board of Pardons and Paroles denied clemency for Ramiro Hernández Llanas on Monday, his final hope for mercy is a reprieve from the state governor. 

“This case cries out for Governor Perry to use his power of reprieve. He must recognise that the state has relied upon shoddy ‘expert’ testimony to get Ramiro Hernández Llanas to the death chamber,” said Rob Freer, Amnesty International’s researcher on the USA. 

At the 2000 trial, the prosecution turned to the testimony of a discredited psychiatrist, Dr James Grigson, to rebut the opinions of mental health experts retained by the defence. Grigson, who had never examined the defendant, declared that Ramiro Hernández Llanas would likely commit future acts of criminal violence because he was a sociopath who lacked a conscience. Persuading the jury that the defendant will be a “future danger” to society, even in prison, is a prerequisite for a death sentence in Texas. 

“Testimony like Dr Grigson’s has been discredited over the years as ‘junk science’, and he himself was reprimanded and then expelled from the American Psychiatric Association because of his resort to such unscientific testimony in capital trials,” said Rob Freer. 

“Given what came next – psychiatric testimony tainted by racial stereotyping – this case stands out starkly as another Texas injustice about to be turned into permanence in the lethal injection chamber.” 

Another psychiatrist, Dr Richard Coons, was presented by the state at a 2008 hearing to rebut a defence expert’s finding that Ramiro Hernández Llanas has ‘mental retardation’ – which would render his execution illegal under a 2002 US Supreme Court ruling. 

Dr Coons never met the prisoner or anyone who knew him, does not speak Spanish, and claimed that the prisoner’s criminal conduct was appropriate for his “cultural group”. 

“It is a fundamental principle of international law that everyone is equal before the law and has the right to criminal proceedings free from racial or other discrimination,” said Rob Freer. 

“While we believe that the death penalty never equates with justice, surely even proponents of judicial killing should see the injustice of a death sentence secured after the presentation of such tainted testimony.” 

The Mexican government filed a brief in the US Supreme Court in January condemning the “defamatory stereotyping of the functional abilities of persons raised in Mr Hernandez’s low socio-economic, Mexican culture”. 

The American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, founded in 1876, together with The Arc of the United States, the USA’s largest community-based organization working with people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, also urged the Court to intervene. It refused to do so. 

Last week the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights issued “precautionary measures”, calling on the USA not to go ahead with the execution so that the Commission could have time to consider a petition before it. Today, the Commission stressed that for the USA to allow the execution to go ahead in these circumstances would “seriously contravenes its international legal obligations”. 

“Texas is no stranger to injustice when it comes to the death penalty,” said Rob Freer. 

“Here it is again, about to carry out a death sentence secured with highly questionable testimony against someone whose mental disability calls the constitutionality of his execution into serious question. Governor Perry must act as a matter of urgency.” 

Background information 

Ramiro Hernández Llanas was sentenced to death in February 2000 for the murder of his employer, Glen Lich, who was bludgeoned to death at his ranch in Kerr County on 14 October 1997. 

Ramiro Hernández Llanas was born into a childhood of abuse and severe poverty in Mexico, with his family living in a cardboard shack next to a rubbish dump on which they would scavenge. In tests conducted over the past decade, Ramiro Hernández Llanas has been assessed as having an IQ in the 50s or 60s. He suffers from severe adaptive functioning deficits across a range of skill areas including linguistic, academic, conceptual, social, work and domestic. 

There have been 15 executions in the USA this year, five of them in Texas. Since judicial killing resumed in the USA in 1977 under revised capital statutes, there have been 1,374 executions nationwide. Texas accounts for 513 of these executions; 274 of them have occurred during Governor Perry’s time in office. 

Rick Perry must stop Wednesday’s execution of Ramiro Hernández Llanas, a Mexican national with a mental disability.

Media Node:  texas Twitter Tag:  deathpenalty Story Location:  United Kingdom 37° 18' 16.722" N, 102° 18' 16.8768" W See map: Google Maps “Governor Perry must recognise that the state has relied upon shoddy ‘expert’ testimony to get Ramiro Hernández Llanas to the death chamber.” Source:  Amnesty International’s Rob Freer

USA: Texas Governor must stop execution of Mexican man with mental disability

Tue, 04/08/2014 - 10:03am
Headline Title:  USA: Texas Governor must stop execution of Mexican man with mental disability 08 April 2014

Texas Governor Rick Perry must stop Wednesday’s execution of Ramiro Hernández Llanas, a Mexican national with a mental disability, Amnesty International said today. 

The state has relied upon racial stereotyping and the views of discredited “expertise” to secure this death sentence – now due to be carried out shortly after 6pm, local time, on 9 April. 

After the Texas Board of Pardons and Paroles denied clemency for Ramiro Hernández Llanas on Monday, his final hope for mercy is a reprieve from the state governor. 

“This case cries out for Governor Perry to use his power of reprieve. He must recognise that the state has relied upon shoddy ‘expert’ testimony to get Ramiro Hernández Llanas to the death chamber,” said Rob Freer, Amnesty International’s researcher on the USA. 

At the 2000 trial, the prosecution turned to the testimony of a discredited psychiatrist, Dr James Grigson, to rebut the opinions of mental health experts retained by the defence. Grigson, who had never examined the defendant, declared that Ramiro Hernández Llanas would likely commit future acts of criminal violence because he was a sociopath who lacked a conscience. Persuading the jury that the defendant will be a “future danger” to society, even in prison, is a prerequisite for a death sentence in Texas. 

“Testimony like Dr Grigson’s has been discredited over the years as ‘junk science’, and he himself was reprimanded and then expelled from the American Psychiatric Association because of his resort to such unscientific testimony in capital trials,” said Rob Freer. 

“Given what came next – psychiatric testimony tainted by racial stereotyping – this case stands out starkly as another Texas injustice about to be turned into permanence in the lethal injection chamber.” 

Another psychiatrist, Dr Richard Coons, was presented by the state at a 2008 hearing to rebut a defence expert’s finding that Ramiro Hernández Llanas has ‘mental retardation’ – which would render his execution illegal under a 2002 US Supreme Court ruling. 

Dr Coons never met the prisoner or anyone who knew him, does not speak Spanish, and claimed that the prisoner’s criminal conduct was appropriate for his “cultural group”. 

“It is a fundamental principle of international law that everyone is equal before the law and has the right to criminal proceedings free from racial or other discrimination,” said Rob Freer. 

“While we believe that the death penalty never equates with justice, surely even proponents of judicial killing should see the injustice of a death sentence secured after the presentation of such tainted testimony.” 

The Mexican government filed a brief in the US Supreme Court in January condemning the “defamatory stereotyping of the functional abilities of persons raised in Mr Hernandez’s low socio-economic, Mexican culture”. 

The American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, founded in 1876, together with The Arc of the United States, the USA’s largest community-based organization working with people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, also urged the Court to intervene. It refused to do so. 

Last week the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights issued “precautionary measures”, calling on the USA not to go ahead with the execution so that the Commission could have time to consider a petition before it. Today, the Commission stressed that for the USA to allow the execution to go ahead in these circumstances would “seriously contravenes its international legal obligations”. 

“Texas is no stranger to injustice when it comes to the death penalty,” said Rob Freer. 

“Here it is again, about to carry out a death sentence secured with highly questionable testimony against someone whose mental disability calls the constitutionality of his execution into serious question. Governor Perry must act as a matter of urgency.” 

Background information 

Ramiro Hernández Llanas was sentenced to death in February 2000 for the murder of his employer, Glen Lich, who was bludgeoned to death at his ranch in Kerr County on 14 October 1997. 

Ramiro Hernández Llanas was born into a childhood of abuse and severe poverty in Mexico, with his family living in a cardboard shack next to a rubbish dump on which they would scavenge. In tests conducted over the past decade, Ramiro Hernández Llanas has been assessed as having an IQ in the 50s or 60s. He suffers from severe adaptive functioning deficits across a range of skill areas including linguistic, academic, conceptual, social, work and domestic. 

There have been 15 executions in the USA this year, five of them in Texas. Since judicial killing resumed in the USA in 1977 under revised capital statutes, there have been 1,374 executions nationwide. Texas accounts for 513 of these executions; 274 of them have occurred during Governor Perry’s time in office. 

Rick Perry must stop Wednesday’s execution of Ramiro Hernández Llanas, a Mexican national with a mental disability.

Media Node:  texas Twitter Tag:  deathpenalty Story Location:  United Kingdom 37° 18' 16.722" N, 102° 18' 16.8768" W See map: Google Maps “Governor Perry must recognise that the state has relied upon shoddy ‘expert’ testimony to get Ramiro Hernández Llanas to the death chamber.” Source:  Amnesty International’s Rob Freer

USA: Texas Governor must stop execution of Mexican man with mental disability

Tue, 04/08/2014 - 10:03am
Headline Title:  USA: Texas Governor must stop execution of Mexican man with mental disability 08 April 2014

Texas Governor Rick Perry must stop Wednesday’s execution of Ramiro Hernández Llanas, a Mexican national with a mental disability, Amnesty International said today. 

The state has relied upon racial stereotyping and the views of discredited “expertise” to secure this death sentence – now due to be carried out shortly after 6pm, local time, on 9 April. 

After the Texas Board of Pardons and Paroles denied clemency for Ramiro Hernández Llanas on Monday, his final hope for mercy is a reprieve from the state governor. 

“This case cries out for Governor Perry to use his power of reprieve. He must recognise that the state has relied upon shoddy ‘expert’ testimony to get Ramiro Hernández Llanas to the death chamber,” said Rob Freer, Amnesty International’s researcher on the USA. 

At the 2000 trial, the prosecution turned to the testimony of a discredited psychiatrist, Dr James Grigson, to rebut the opinions of mental health experts retained by the defence. Grigson, who had never examined the defendant, declared that Ramiro Hernández Llanas would likely commit future acts of criminal violence because he was a sociopath who lacked a conscience. Persuading the jury that the defendant will be a “future danger” to society, even in prison, is a prerequisite for a death sentence in Texas. 

“Testimony like Dr Grigson’s has been discredited over the years as ‘junk science’, and he himself was reprimanded and then expelled from the American Psychiatric Association because of his resort to such unscientific testimony in capital trials,” said Rob Freer. 

“Given what came next – psychiatric testimony tainted by racial stereotyping – this case stands out starkly as another Texas injustice about to be turned into permanence in the lethal injection chamber.” 

Another psychiatrist, Dr Richard Coons, was presented by the state at a 2008 hearing to rebut a defence expert’s finding that Ramiro Hernández Llanas has ‘mental retardation’ – which would render his execution illegal under a 2002 US Supreme Court ruling. 

Dr Coons never met the prisoner or anyone who knew him, does not speak Spanish, and claimed that the prisoner’s criminal conduct was appropriate for his “cultural group”. 

“It is a fundamental principle of international law that everyone is equal before the law and has the right to criminal proceedings free from racial or other discrimination,” said Rob Freer. 

“While we believe that the death penalty never equates with justice, surely even proponents of judicial killing should see the injustice of a death sentence secured after the presentation of such tainted testimony.” 

The Mexican government filed a brief in the US Supreme Court in January condemning the “defamatory stereotyping of the functional abilities of persons raised in Mr Hernandez’s low socio-economic, Mexican culture”. 

The American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, founded in 1876, together with The Arc of the United States, the USA’s largest community-based organization working with people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, also urged the Court to intervene. It refused to do so. 

Last week the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights issued “precautionary measures”, calling on the USA not to go ahead with the execution so that the Commission could have time to consider a petition before it. Today, the Commission stressed that for the USA to allow the execution to go ahead in these circumstances would “seriously contravenes its international legal obligations”. 

“Texas is no stranger to injustice when it comes to the death penalty,” said Rob Freer. 

“Here it is again, about to carry out a death sentence secured with highly questionable testimony against someone whose mental disability calls the constitutionality of his execution into serious question. Governor Perry must act as a matter of urgency.” 

Background information 

Ramiro Hernández Llanas was sentenced to death in February 2000 for the murder of his employer, Glen Lich, who was bludgeoned to death at his ranch in Kerr County on 14 October 1997. 

Ramiro Hernández Llanas was born into a childhood of abuse and severe poverty in Mexico, with his family living in a cardboard shack next to a rubbish dump on which they would scavenge. In tests conducted over the past decade, Ramiro Hernández Llanas has been assessed as having an IQ in the 50s or 60s. He suffers from severe adaptive functioning deficits across a range of skill areas including linguistic, academic, conceptual, social, work and domestic. 

There have been 15 executions in the USA this year, five of them in Texas. Since judicial killing resumed in the USA in 1977 under revised capital statutes, there have been 1,374 executions nationwide. Texas accounts for 513 of these executions; 274 of them have occurred during Governor Perry’s time in office. 

Rick Perry must stop Wednesday’s execution of Ramiro Hernández Llanas, a Mexican national with a mental disability.

Media Node:  texas Twitter Tag:  deathpenalty Story Location:  United Kingdom 37° 18' 16.722" N, 102° 18' 16.8768" W See map: Google Maps “Governor Perry must recognise that the state has relied upon shoddy ‘expert’ testimony to get Ramiro Hernández Llanas to the death chamber.” Source:  Amnesty International’s Rob Freer

USA: Texas Governor must stop execution of Mexican man with mental disability

Tue, 04/08/2014 - 10:03am
Headline Title:  USA: Texas Governor must stop execution of Mexican man with mental disability 08 April 2014

Texas Governor Rick Perry must stop Wednesday’s execution of Ramiro Hernández Llanas, a Mexican national with a mental disability, Amnesty International said today. 

The state has relied upon racial stereotyping and the views of discredited “expertise” to secure this death sentence – now due to be carried out shortly after 6pm, local time, on 9 April. 

After the Texas Board of Pardons and Paroles denied clemency for Ramiro Hernández Llanas on Monday, his final hope for mercy is a reprieve from the state governor. 

“This case cries out for Governor Perry to use his power of reprieve. He must recognise that the state has relied upon shoddy ‘expert’ testimony to get Ramiro Hernández Llanas to the death chamber,” said Rob Freer, Amnesty International’s researcher on the USA. 

At the 2000 trial, the prosecution turned to the testimony of a discredited psychiatrist, Dr James Grigson, to rebut the opinions of mental health experts retained by the defence. Grigson, who had never examined the defendant, declared that Ramiro Hernández Llanas would likely commit future acts of criminal violence because he was a sociopath who lacked a conscience. Persuading the jury that the defendant will be a “future danger” to society, even in prison, is a prerequisite for a death sentence in Texas. 

“Testimony like Dr Grigson’s has been discredited over the years as ‘junk science’, and he himself was reprimanded and then expelled from the American Psychiatric Association because of his resort to such unscientific testimony in capital trials,” said Rob Freer. 

“Given what came next – psychiatric testimony tainted by racial stereotyping – this case stands out starkly as another Texas injustice about to be turned into permanence in the lethal injection chamber.” 

Another psychiatrist, Dr Richard Coons, was presented by the state at a 2008 hearing to rebut a defence expert’s finding that Ramiro Hernández Llanas has ‘mental retardation’ – which would render his execution illegal under a 2002 US Supreme Court ruling. 

Dr Coons never met the prisoner or anyone who knew him, does not speak Spanish, and claimed that the prisoner’s criminal conduct was appropriate for his “cultural group”. 

“It is a fundamental principle of international law that everyone is equal before the law and has the right to criminal proceedings free from racial or other discrimination,” said Rob Freer. 

“While we believe that the death penalty never equates with justice, surely even proponents of judicial killing should see the injustice of a death sentence secured after the presentation of such tainted testimony.” 

The Mexican government filed a brief in the US Supreme Court in January condemning the “defamatory stereotyping of the functional abilities of persons raised in Mr Hernandez’s low socio-economic, Mexican culture”. 

The American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, founded in 1876, together with The Arc of the United States, the USA’s largest community-based organization working with people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, also urged the Court to intervene. It refused to do so. 

Last week the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights issued “precautionary measures”, calling on the USA not to go ahead with the execution so that the Commission could have time to consider a petition before it. Today, the Commission stressed that for the USA to allow the execution to go ahead in these circumstances would “seriously contravenes its international legal obligations”. 

“Texas is no stranger to injustice when it comes to the death penalty,” said Rob Freer. 

“Here it is again, about to carry out a death sentence secured with highly questionable testimony against someone whose mental disability calls the constitutionality of his execution into serious question. Governor Perry must act as a matter of urgency.” 

Background information 

Ramiro Hernández Llanas was sentenced to death in February 2000 for the murder of his employer, Glen Lich, who was bludgeoned to death at his ranch in Kerr County on 14 October 1997. 

Ramiro Hernández Llanas was born into a childhood of abuse and severe poverty in Mexico, with his family living in a cardboard shack next to a rubbish dump on which they would scavenge. In tests conducted over the past decade, Ramiro Hernández Llanas has been assessed as having an IQ in the 50s or 60s. He suffers from severe adaptive functioning deficits across a range of skill areas including linguistic, academic, conceptual, social, work and domestic. 

There have been 15 executions in the USA this year, five of them in Texas. Since judicial killing resumed in the USA in 1977 under revised capital statutes, there have been 1,374 executions nationwide. Texas accounts for 513 of these executions; 274 of them have occurred during Governor Perry’s time in office. 

Rick Perry must stop Wednesday’s execution of Ramiro Hernández Llanas, a Mexican national with a mental disability.

Media Node:  texas Twitter Tag:  deathpenalty Story Location:  United Kingdom 37° 18' 16.722" N, 102° 18' 16.8768" W See map: Google Maps “Rick Perry must recognise that the state has relied upon shoddy ‘expert’ testimony to get Ramiro Hernández Llanas to the death chamber.” Source:  Amnesty International’s Rob Freer

USA: Texas Governor must stop execution of Mexican man with mental disability

Tue, 04/08/2014 - 10:03am
Headline Title:  USA: Texas Governor must stop execution of Mexican man with mental disability 08 April 2014

Texas Governor Rick Perry must stop Wednesday’s execution of Ramiro Hernández Llanas, a Mexican national with a mental disability, Amnesty International said today. 

The state has relied upon racial stereotyping and the views of discredited “expertise” to secure this death sentence – now due to be carried out shortly after 6pm, local time, on 9 April. 

After the Texas Board of Pardons and Paroles denied clemency for Ramiro Hernández Llanas on Monday, his final hope for mercy is a reprieve from the state governor. 

“This case cries out for Governor Perry to use his power of reprieve. He must recognise that the state has relied upon shoddy ‘expert’ testimony to get Ramiro Hernández Llanas to the death chamber,” said Rob Freer, Amnesty International’s researcher on the USA. 

At the 2000 trial, the prosecution turned to the testimony of a discredited psychiatrist, Dr James Grigson, to rebut the opinions of mental health experts retained by the defence. Grigson, who had never examined the defendant, declared that Ramiro Hernández Llanas would likely commit future acts of criminal violence because he was a sociopath who lacked a conscience. Persuading the jury that the defendant will be a “future danger” to society, even in prison, is a prerequisite for a death sentence in Texas. 

“Testimony like Dr Grigson’s has been discredited over the years as ‘junk science’, and he himself was reprimanded and then expelled from the American Psychiatric Association because of his resort to such unscientific testimony in capital trials,” said Rob Freer. 

“Given what came next – psychiatric testimony tainted by racial stereotyping – this case stands out starkly as another Texas injustice about to be turned into permanence in the lethal injection chamber.” 

Another psychiatrist, Dr Richard Coons, was presented by the state at a 2008 hearing to rebut a defence expert’s finding that Ramiro Hernández Llanas has ‘mental retardation’ – which would render his execution illegal under a 2002 US Supreme Court ruling. 

Dr Coons never met the prisoner or anyone who knew him, does not speak Spanish, and claimed that the prisoner’s criminal conduct was appropriate for his “cultural group”. 

“It is a fundamental principle of international law that everyone is equal before the law and has the right to criminal proceedings free from racial or other discrimination,” said Rob Freer. 

“While we believe that the death penalty never equates with justice, surely even proponents of judicial killing should see the injustice of a death sentence secured after the presentation of such tainted testimony.” 

The Mexican government filed a brief in the US Supreme Court in January condemning the “defamatory stereotyping of the functional abilities of persons raised in Mr Hernandez’s low socio-economic, Mexican culture”. 

The American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, founded in 1876, together with The Arc of the United States, the USA’s largest community-based organization working with people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, also urged the Court to intervene. It refused to do so. 

Last week the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights issued “precautionary measures”, calling on the USA not to go ahead with the execution so that the Commission could have time to consider a petition before it. Today, the Commission stressed that for the USA to allow the execution to go ahead in these circumstances would “seriously contravenes its international legal obligations”. 

“Texas is no stranger to injustice when it comes to the death penalty,” said Rob Freer. 

“Here it is again, about to carry out a death sentence secured with highly questionable testimony against someone whose mental disability calls the constitutionality of his execution into serious question. Governor Perry must act as a matter of urgency.” 

Background information 

Ramiro Hernández Llanas was sentenced to death in February 2000 for the murder of his employer, Glen Lich, who was bludgeoned to death at his ranch in Kerr County on 14 October 1997. 

Ramiro Hernández Llanas was born into a childhood of abuse and severe poverty in Mexico, with his family living in a cardboard shack next to a rubbish dump on which they would scavenge. In tests conducted over the past decade, Ramiro Hernández Llanas has been assessed as having an IQ in the 50s or 60s. He suffers from severe adaptive functioning deficits across a range of skill areas including linguistic, academic, conceptual, social, work and domestic. 

There have been 15 executions in the USA this year, five of them in Texas. Since judicial killing resumed in the USA in 1977 under revised capital statutes, there have been 1,374 executions nationwide. Texas accounts for 513 of these executions; 274 of them have occurred during Governor Perry’s time in office. 

Rick Perry must stop Wednesday’s execution of Ramiro Hernández Llanas, a Mexican national with a mental disability.

Media Node:  texas Twitter Tag:  deathpenalty Story Location:  United Kingdom 37° 18' 16.722" N, 102° 18' 16.8768" W See map: Google Maps “Rick Perry must recognise that the state has relied upon shoddy ‘expert’ testimony to get Ramiro Hernández Llanas to the death chamber.” Source:  Amnesty International’s Rob Freer

USA: Texas Governor must stop execution of Mexican man with mental disability

Tue, 04/08/2014 - 10:03am
Headline Title:  USA: Texas Governor must stop execution of Mexican man with mental disability 08 April 2014

Texas Governor Rick Perry must stop Wednesday’s execution of Ramiro Hernández Llanas, a Mexican national with a mental disability, Amnesty International said today. 

The state has relied upon racial stereotyping and the views of discredited “expertise” to secure this death sentence – now due to be carried out shortly after 6pm, local time, on 9 April. 

After the Texas Board of Pardons and Paroles denied clemency for Ramiro Hernández Llanas on Monday, his final hope for mercy is a reprieve from the state governor. 

“This case cries out for Governor Perry to use his power of reprieve. He must recognise that the state has relied upon shoddy ‘expert’ testimony to get Ramiro Hernández Llanas to the death chamber,” said Rob Freer, Amnesty International’s researcher on the USA. 

At the 2000 trial, the prosecution turned to the testimony of a discredited psychiatrist, Dr James Grigson, to rebut the opinions of mental health experts retained by the defence. Grigson, who had never examined the defendant, declared that Ramiro Hernández Llanas would likely commit future acts of criminal violence because he was a sociopath who lacked a conscience. Persuading the jury that the defendant will be a “future danger” to society, even in prison, is a prerequisite for a death sentence in Texas. 

“Testimony like Dr Grigson’s has been discredited over the years as ‘junk science’, and he himself was reprimanded and then expelled from the American Psychiatric Association because of his resort to such unscientific testimony in capital trials,” said Rob Freer. 

“Given what came next – psychiatric testimony tainted by racial stereotyping – this case stands out starkly as another Texas injustice about to be turned into permanence in the lethal injection chamber.” 

Another psychiatrist, Dr Richard Coons, was presented by the state at a 2008 hearing to rebut a defence expert’s finding that Ramiro Hernández Llanas has ‘mental retardation’ – which would render his execution illegal under a 2002 US Supreme Court ruling. 

Dr Coons never met the prisoner or anyone who knew him, does not speak Spanish, and claimed that the prisoner’s criminal conduct was appropriate for his “cultural group”. 

“It is a fundamental principle of international law that everyone is equal before the law and has the right to criminal proceedings free from racial or other discrimination,” said Rob Freer. 

“While we believe that the death penalty never equates with justice, surely even proponents of judicial killing should see the injustice of a death sentence secured after the presentation of such tainted testimony.” 

The Mexican government filed a brief in the US Supreme Court in January condemning the “defamatory stereotyping of the functional abilities of persons raised in Mr Hernandez’s low socio-economic, Mexican culture”. 

The American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, founded in 1876, together with The Arc of the United States, the USA’s largest community-based organization working with people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, also urged the Court to intervene. It refused to do so. 

Last week the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights issued “precautionary measures”, calling on the USA not to go ahead with the execution so that the Commission could have time to consider a petition before it. Today, the Commission stressed that for the USA to allow the execution to go ahead in these circumstances would “seriously contravenes its international legal obligations”. 

“Texas is no stranger to injustice when it comes to the death penalty,” said Rob Freer. 

“Here it is again, about to carry out a death sentence secured with highly questionable testimony against someone whose mental disability calls the constitutionality of his execution into serious question. Governor Perry must act as a matter of urgency.” 

Background information 

Ramiro Hernández Llanas was sentenced to death in February 2000 for the murder of his employer, Glen Lich, who was bludgeoned to death at his ranch in Kerr County on 14 October 1997. 

Ramiro Hernández Llanas was born into a childhood of abuse and severe poverty in Mexico, with his family living in a cardboard shack next to a rubbish dump on which they would scavenge. In tests conducted over the past decade, Ramiro Hernández Llanas has been assessed as having an IQ in the 50s or 60s. He suffers from severe adaptive functioning deficits across a range of skill areas including linguistic, academic, conceptual, social, work and domestic. 

There have been 15 executions in the USA this year, five of them in Texas. Since judicial killing resumed in the USA in 1977 under revised capital statutes, there have been 1,374 executions nationwide. Texas accounts for 513 of these executions; 274 of them have occurred during Governor Perry’s time in office. 

Rick Perry must stop Wednesday’s execution of Ramiro Hernández Llanas, a Mexican national with a mental disability.

Media Node:  texas Twitter Tag:  deathpenalty Story Location:  United Kingdom 37° 18' 16.722" N, 102° 18' 16.8768" W See map: Google Maps “Rick Perry must recognise that the state has relied upon shoddy ‘expert’ testimony to get Ramiro Hernández Llanas to the death chamber.” Source:  Amnesty International’s Rob Freer

USA: Texas Governor must stop execution of Mexican man with mental disability

Tue, 04/08/2014 - 10:03am
Headline Title:  USA: Texas Governor must stop execution of Mexican man with mental disability 08 April 2014

Texas Governor Rick Perry must stop Wednesday’s execution of Ramiro Hernández Llanas, a Mexican national with a mental disability, Amnesty International said today. 

The state has relied upon racial stereotyping and the views of discredited “expertise” to secure this death sentence – now due to be carried out shortly after 6pm, local time, on 9 April. 

After the Texas Board of Pardons and Paroles denied clemency for Ramiro Hernández Llanas on Monday, his final hope for mercy is a reprieve from the state governor. 

“This case cries out for Governor Perry to use his power of reprieve. He must recognise that the state has relied upon shoddy ‘expert’ testimony to get Ramiro Hernández Llanas to the death chamber,” said Rob Freer, Amnesty International’s researcher on the USA. 

At the 2000 trial, the prosecution turned to the testimony of a discredited psychiatrist, Dr James Grigson, to rebut the opinions of mental health experts retained by the defence. Grigson, who had never examined the defendant, declared that Ramiro Hernández Llanas would likely commit future acts of criminal violence because he was a sociopath who lacked a conscience. Persuading the jury that the defendant will be a “future danger” to society, even in prison, is a prerequisite for a death sentence in Texas. 

“Testimony like Dr Grigson’s has been discredited over the years as ‘junk science’, and he himself was reprimanded and then expelled from the American Psychiatric Association because of his resort to such unscientific testimony in capital trials,” said Rob Freer. 

“Given what came next – psychiatric testimony tainted by racial stereotyping – this case stands out starkly as another Texas injustice about to be turned into permanence in the lethal injection chamber.” 

Another psychiatrist, Dr Richard Coons, was presented by the state at a 2008 hearing to rebut a defence expert’s finding that Ramiro Hernández Llanas has ‘mental retardation’ – which would render his execution illegal under a 2002 US Supreme Court ruling. 

Dr Coons never met the prisoner or anyone who knew him, does not speak Spanish, and claimed that the prisoner’s criminal conduct was appropriate for his “cultural group”. 

“It is a fundamental principle of international law that everyone is equal before the law and has the right to criminal proceedings free from racial or other discrimination,” said Rob Freer. 

“While we believe that the death penalty never equates with justice, surely even proponents of judicial killing should see the injustice of a death sentence secured after the presentation of such tainted testimony.” 

The Mexican government filed a brief in the US Supreme Court in January condemning the “defamatory stereotyping of the functional abilities of persons raised in Mr Hernandez’s low socio-economic, Mexican culture”. 

The American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, founded in 1876, together with The Arc of the United States, the USA’s largest community-based organization working with people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, also urged the Court to intervene. It refused to do so. 

Last week the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights issued “precautionary measures”, calling on the USA not to go ahead with the execution so that the Commission could have time to consider a petition before it. Today, the Commission stressed that for the USA to allow the execution to go ahead in these circumstances would “seriously contravenes its international legal obligations”. 

“Texas is no stranger to injustice when it comes to the death penalty,” said Rob Freer. 

“Here it is again, about to carry out a death sentence secured with highly questionable testimony against someone whose mental disability calls the constitutionality of his execution into serious question. Governor Perry must act as a matter of urgency.” 

Background information 

Ramiro Hernández Llanas was sentenced to death in February 2000 for the murder of his employer, Glen Lich, who was bludgeoned to death at his ranch in Kerr County on 14 October 1997. 

Ramiro Hernández Llanas was born into a childhood of abuse and severe poverty in Mexico, with his family living in a cardboard shack next to a rubbish dump on which they would scavenge. In tests conducted over the past decade, Ramiro Hernández Llanas has been assessed as having an IQ in the 50s or 60s. He suffers from severe adaptive functioning deficits across a range of skill areas including linguistic, academic, conceptual, social, work and domestic. 

There have been 15 executions in the USA this year, five of them in Texas. Since judicial killing resumed in the USA in 1977 under revised capital statutes, there have been 1,374 executions nationwide. Texas accounts for 513 of these executions; 274 of them have occurred during Governor Perry’s time in office. 

Rick Perry must stop Wednesday’s execution of Ramiro Hernández Llanas, a Mexican national with a mental disability.

Media Node:  texas Twitter Tag:  deathpenalty Story Location:  United Kingdom 37° 18' 16.722" N, 102° 18' 16.8768" W See map: Google Maps “Rick Perry must recognise that the state has relied upon shoddy ‘expert’ testimony to get Ramiro Hernández Llanas to the death chamber.” Source:  Amnesty International’s Rob Freer
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